Get Ready to Transform in US Trailer for the third TETSUO Film

Tetsuo: The Iron Man is a balls to the wall, bug-nuts crazy, 1989 Japanese cyber-punk film about a man that slowly begins to grow metal from his body.  It’s stark black and white visuals and spastic revolutionary editing can still be seen as a major influence on filmmakers working today.  In short … search it out and watch it if you haven’t already (Hopefully, you don’t have a shaky stomach).  Director Shinya Tsukamoto expanded his universe (and his budget) with the 1992 “quasi-sequel” Tetsuo: Body Hammer.  Since, the director has gone on to direct the criminally underrated A Snake of June and Nightmare Detective.  He returns to the bodily horror with the third installment, Tetsuo: The Bullet Man,  in the series that is set for a limited release through IFC Midnight this year.  Continue on to watch the new US trailer.

Judging by the trailer, it seems Tsukamoto is giving fans more of the same … which might not be a bad thing.  One thing is for sure, it certainly looks like there is more action in the new entry into the series. Tetsuo: The Bullet Man can now be seen On-Demand and will see a limited theatrical run later this year. For more on the film, you can visit the IFC Midnight site here.

 

Source: Twitch Film


0saves


If you enjoyed this post, please consider leaving a comment or subscribing to the RSS feed to have future articles delivered to your feed reader.

SHARE THIS POST

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Myspace
  • Google Buzz
  • Reddit
  • Stumnleupon
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • Technorati
Author: Michael Haffner View all posts by
Somewhere between growing up on a steady diet of Saturday morning trips to the local comic-book shop, collecting an unhealthy amount of action figures, and frequent viewings of Ray Harryhausen and Hammer Horror films, came forth a nerdy boy that was torn between journalism and the arts. In high school, Michael found himself writing a movie column for the school newspaper. Yet, he went on to get a BFA in Studio Art at Webster University. When not writing about films, you can still find him discussing classic horror, collecting action figures, and reading Batman. Clearly, not much has changed.